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Fundrise Starter Portfolio eREIT vs. Vanguard REIT ETF Review – Updated December 2018

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Updated December 2018. This post tracks my experiment comparing a and the . In Fundrise, we have a start-up that bought a concentrated basket of roughly 20 properties chosen from the private market. In Vanguard, we have a one of the largest real estate ETFs in the world that owns a passive slice of 184 public-traded REITs. I invested $1,000 into both in October 2017 and plan to let them run for 5 years.

Fundrise Starter Portfolio background. Despite the name, the is actually a simple 50/50 mix of their two longest-running eREITs: the Fundrise Income eREIT and the Fundrise Growth eREIT. This private eREIT works within recent crowdfunding legislation that allows all investors to own a basket of individual real estate properties (not just accredited investors with high net worth). The minimum deposit is $500. You must buy shares directly from Fundrise, and there are liquidity restrictions as this is meant to be a long-term investment. Here’s a recent map of locations for the holdings. Most are apartment complexes, condominiums, and hotels.

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Vanguard REIT ETF background. The (VNQ) is one of the largest index funds to invest in publicly-traded real estate investment trusts (REITs). You can purchase it via any brokerage account. You have the liquidity of being to sell on any day the stock market is open. A single share currently costs about $76, not including an trade commission. You are holding a tiny slice of (tens of?) thousands of office buildings, hotels, nursing homes, shopping centers, apartment complexes, and so on. Here are the recent top 10 holdings:

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Expenses. The Fundrise Starter Portfolio has an 0.85% annual asset management fee and a 0.15% annual investment advisory fee (waived during 2017). The Vanguard REIT ETF has an expense ratio of 0.12%, with each public REIT having their own internal costs to manage their properties. Due to scale, I would expect the net effect of fees to be significantly higher for the Fundrise assets than for the Vanguard ETF. We will see if Fundrise can provide higher net returns for this concentrated holding.

Five-year time horizon. Both Fundrise and VNQ usually announce dividend distributions on a quarterly basis. Vanguard updates the NAV daily, but Fundrise only updates their NAV quarterly. Fundrise NAVs are only estimates as there is no daily market value available (similar to your house). Therefore, I plan on holding onto this investment for 5 years at the minimum. This will allow the investments to “play out” and also avoid any early redemption fees. I will withhold final judgement until both investments are cashed out, but will provide quarterly updates.

Fundrise Portfolio performance updates. Screenshot of my most recent statement:

  • 10/20/17: $1,000 initial investment – 50 shares @ $10.00/share Income eREIT and 48.78 shares @ $10.25/share Growth eREIT.
  • 1/9/18: 2017 Q4 dividends of $17.98 received and reinvested.
  • 4/11/18: 2018 Q1 dividends of $16.13 received and reinvested.
  • 7/11/18: 2018 Q2 dividends of $17.60 received and reinvested.
  • 10/10/18: 2018 Q3 dividends of $19.10 received and reinvested.
  • 11/30/18: Total Fundrise value $1,112.85 (includes reinvested dividends).

Vanguard REIT ETF performance updates. I own VNQ and the mutual fund equivalent (same underlying holdings) in my retirement portfolio, but will be using Morningstar tools to track the performance of a $1,000 investment bought on the same date of 10/20/17.

  • 10/20/17: $1,000 initial investment – 11.9545 shares at $83.65/share.
  • 12/27/17, VNQ distributed a gain of $0.012 per share, return of capital of $0.37 per share, and a dividend of $0.88 per share.
  • 3/26/18: VNQ dividend of $0.71 per share.
  • 6/18/18: VNQ dividend of $0.73 per share.
  • 9/24/18: VNQ dividend of $1.14 per share.
  • 11/30/18: Total VNQ value $1,023.15 (includes reinvested dividends).

Here is the historical chart with monthly data points. Again, I wouldn’t put too much stock into the short-term movements as the accuracy of the Fundrise NAV is inherently limited, but this is the best information that I have available.

Every month or so, Fundrise sends me an e-mail with an update on a new property that they have acquired, or a property where they have exited. Both Fundrise and the ETF are completely passive holdings.

Bottom line. I’m doing a buy-and-hold-and-watch experiment where I compare investing in real estate via Fundrise direct investment and the largest REIT index ETF from Vanguard. I’ll provide occasional updates, but more important is what happens over 5+ years.

You can learn more about all Fundrise eREIT options here. This is the second time I have invested with Fundrise. Last time I decided to test out a withdrawal in my Fundrise Liquidity and Redemption review.

Hanscom Federal CU Thrive Review: 5.00% APY High Interest Starter Account

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(Note: As of 12/10/18, HFCU also has a at 3.00% APY.)

Hanscom Federal Credit Union (HFCU) has hiked the rate on their to 5.00% APY, which is a capped certificate of deposit that rewards consistent saving. The rate is set for 12 months, and during those 12 months you can transfer up to $500 every month from a HFCU checking account. No monthly fees. However, you cannot make any withdrawals during those 12 months, or you will be subject to an early withdrawal penalty of 90 days interest.

This product is not meant for big balances. Instead, it is meant to encourage a modest savings habit. 5.00% APY is more than double what the top high-yield savings accounts offer right now.

How much interest can I earn? At 5% APY, if you maxed out this account and set aside the full $500 a month for 12 months, at the end you’d have put in $6,000 and earned about $150 in interest by the end of the year (~$162 if you made every transfer on the 1st of the each month by my quick calculations). $6,000 also happens to be just about the same amount as a full Roth IRA contribution. Hint, hint.

At the end of the 12 months, all accrued savings earned dividends will be transferred into your primary savings account. Each member can only have one CU Thrive account open at one time, but after one 12-month period ends you can open up another one (assuming it is still offered). (PDF).

Eligibility details. To open a CU Thrive account, you must first open an HFCU checking account in addition to the savings account required for all members. HFCU offers a free checking account with no direct deposit and no minimum balance requirement. HFCU membership is open to active duty or retired military, but anyone can also join the for a one-time $20 fee and be eligible. On the application, choose the option “I am a member of or will be joining a sponsoring member organization.” You must also keep $25 in the share savings account as long as you are a member.

New refer-a-friend program. HFCU has a referral program which offers an additional $30 cash bonus after your new savings and checking accounts are open and in good standing for 90 days. The referring member gets $30 as well. If you would like a referral from me, please me send your full name, e-mail address, the text “HFCU referral” via my form. I will use this information only to fill out .

Account opening process. I started the online application and said I would join the Nashua River Watershed Association for a one-time $35 fee (the AFA option was not available at the time). I had to provide the usual personal information and then answer questions based on my credit report to verify my identity. Based on my free credit monitoring, they did not perform a hard pull on my credit report. You can fund with an online bank transfer but they also gave me the option to fund with credit card up to $2,000. They didn’t mention if this would be considered a cash advance or not, but it showed up as a purchase for me. Finally, you must print out, sign, and mail in a signature card. You can also open an account in-person. All of their physical branches appear to be located in Massachusetts.

My 1-year experience. I had set the maximum $500 to be transferred every month to my CU Thrive account from my HFCU Checking account. I made 11 transfers but missed one because my checking balance was too low on the date of automatic transfer. My fault. When that happens, the account basically just skips the transfer. There is no penalty, you just don’t get to earn interest on that money. I called them but they said there was no way to replace that transfer, even if I moved more money into the checking account a day later. Other than that, everything went very smoothly and I was paid my interest as promised. At the 1-year maturity date, the funds were automatically transferred to my HFCU savings account and the CU Thrive no longer shows up on my online account page. I can now open up another CU Thrive account, if I wish.

I also discovered that Hanscom Federal has paid a to its Credit Union members for over 15 consecutive years. In 2017, they paid a 2% bonus on dividends earned and consumer finance charges paid over the year. So on top my my $78.46 of interest earned, I earned another $1.57 in bonus loyalty dividends.

In addition to the CU Thrive and free checking options, HFCU also has a account that offers up to 2.50% APY on balances up to $15,000 if you make at least 12 debit card or credit card purchases per month, complete at least 1 ACH Credit/Direct deposit per month, and enroll in online statements.

Bottom line. The CU Thrive account is a good option for people looking to build up a savings habit, with 5.00% APY for 12 months, $30 sign-up bonus, and easy membership eligibility. However, the system really works best if you use HFCU’s free checking as your primary checking account. Juggling it as an external savings account is perfectly possible, but you have to keep on top of your transfers to avoid idle cash earning zero interest. I received all of the interest promised, the customer service was nice and polite when ed, and any errors were my own.

Navy Federal CU Year End Specials: $100 IRA Bonus + 3.75% APY 40-Month IRA Certificate

Updated 2018. Navy Federal Credit Union (membership now limited primarily to those with military affiliation) announced their year-end specials. 40-month IRA Certificate at 3.75% APY with add-ons. Open with $50 minimum. Make additional … [More]

Health Care Flexible Spending Accounts: Last-Minute FSA Eligible Ideas

Here's my annual reminder to get back all the money you put into your Healthcare Flexible Spending Accounts (HC FSA) before the end of the year. The maximum salary deduction limits were $2,650 (2018) and $2,700 (2019). Quick ideas. If you … [More]

Top 10 Best Small Business Credit Card Bonus Offers – December 2018

Do you have small business income or work as an independent contractor? Uber/Lyft, Amazon, eBay, Etsy, Airbnb? You are eligible to open a small business credit card, which keeps your personal and business expenses separate. If you are not a … [More]

Amazon Coupon Code: $5 off $20+ of Print Books

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Big List of Kids Ski Free Passport Programs (3rd-6th Grade)

A friend of ours told us about the Colorado Ski Passport that lets 5th and graders from any state ski for free at several Colorado resorts, and I thought that was a great concept to promote this fun outdoor activity. If you can get even a single … [More]

Expedia Activities: $30 off $40+ Coupon Code

Update: This offer has expired. Expedia has a new coupon code THANKYOU which will get you $30 off $40+ in experiences booked through Expedia Activities. Officially it expires 12/31/18, but it will probably end early, and your activity has to … [More]

Giving Flowchart: How To Donate Wisely

If you are looking for some direction about donating your time and/or money, here is a nice infographic from the Bloomberg article These 27 Strategies Will Make Philanthropy an Effective Pursuit (click to enlarge): It's from last year, but … [More]

Dependent Care FSA: Save on Daycare, Preschool, Summer Camps, After-School, and Elder Care

One of the newer work perks that we took advantage of this year was the Dependent Care Flexible Spending Account (DCFSA). This is separate from the Health Care Flexible Spending Account (HCFSA) and the Health Savings Account (HSA). However, they … [More]

Best Interest Rates on Cash – December 2018

Here's my monthly roundup of the best interest rates on cash for December 2018, roughly sorted from shortest to longest maturities. Check out my Ultimate Rate-Chaser Calculator to get an idea of how much extra interest you'd earn if you are moving … [More]

Top 10 Best Credit Card Bonus Offers – December 2018

Updated December 2018. That space in your wallet or purse is more valuable than you think. Credit card companies are fighting it out, offering strong perks and $500+ value for a single card during the first year to encourage you to apply and try it … [More]

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